The Kailash temple at Ellora – preserving ancient wisdom for mankind

The Kailash temple at Ellora – preserving ancient wisdom for mankind


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When visiting the Kailash temple in the silence before dawn, one can’t help but bow down to the ones who designed and carved this majestic reminder of an unknown past. As it is still dark, it is not the time to wander around and see what is there for the physical eye, such as the enclosing high walls of rock, the beauty and perfection of the structures of the shrines, the many statues of Vedic deities and celestials, the panels of the Ramayana and Mahabharata, the rows of elephants, lions and makaras, the powerful lion-like sharduls or the water pots topping the temple roofs. All this is for later in the day. Now, before noisy tourists, screaming school classes and groups of pilgrims come, is a time to go upstairs to the holy shrine, leave the senses behind to feel the REAL and communicate in solitude with what is beyond the mind.

The intricate and detailed panels carved into the temple wall. Credit: Kartika

Entering the Mandapa, in front of the Hiranyagharba, the Sanctum Sanctorum, is like entering another world. The sixteen massive pillars, set in perfect symmetry in groups of four, stand in majestic command, glowing from an Inner light. Whispering voices tell to circumambulate these pillars from left to right as though circumambulating the Universe and read the symbols, carved into each of the four pillar sides. Nothing is meant just as decoration, all bears a message to tell. But – how to read it? Only the heart can do so. For an analysing mind, the symbols remain just that. What if the heart is not open or not open enough? There are keys, some are easy to find, others are only for the Highest of women or men, waiting to be opened at a time when mankind is ready to understand, accept and realise a new era of Life.

One of the keys is easy to get. The Kailash temple is not built. All is cut and carved from ONE single piece of rock, hewn out of the Charanandri hills of the Sahyadri range of the Deccan Plateau at a village, which once was called Elapura, now it is known as Ellora, 30 km northwest of Aurangabad.

Nothing of the original temple was brought in from outside. All was created out of One, all is part of One. Nothing stands by itself. All is a symbol of the functions of creation. The Kailash temple is not just one of the many ancient sites the ancestors have left in what is India today. Officially it is a Hindu (Brahmanic) temple but it is more than that. It may well be one of the holiest sites on earth, a keeper of wisdom from long ago, a preserver of the lost knowledge of life. It is there for all who come and want to learn.

The Kailash temple. Credit: Kartika

Though this temple, its structure, design and carvings have been altered many times, the original message survived, guarded and protected by scores of angels, which are seen hanging in reliefs on the temple walls, surrounding the sculptures of deities or feel them as etherical beings when they come in the silence of the night to keep the cosmic functions alive by singing their songs of creation. Angels are all over Maharashtra’s ancient sites, but nowhere else are so many in just one place. Is this why the Kailash temple is open to the sky?

There are many more temples at this Ellora site, all next to each other; thirty four are open to visitors. Some are Hindu, some are dedicated to Lord Buddha and some to Mahavira, the founder of the Jains. But unlike the Kailash temple, they are caves, hewn out horizontally, open only to the front (except for another smaller temple of the Jains). The Kailash temple was cut from the top down in a U-shape form, about 50 Meters deep in the back and sliding to lower levels on the sides to the front where there is the entry gate. Cut with what? With hammer and chisel? There are chisel marks along the walls of the rocks, but spiritual masters say, the chiseling was done long after the rock walls were cut and the original temple created. Were the chisels just use to straighten and smoothen the sides and carve out new galleries and caves in the enclosing walls? The mystery remains. How was it possible to cut down straight into this Basalt rock, dig a broad trench and leave a huge piece in the center out of which the temple shrines were carved, ten altogether?

That these rocks are full of crystals may be part of the answer. Could it be there once were technologies, using crystals not only to hold information as they now do in computers and mobile phones, but turning their vibrations into energy to cut rocks as hard as Basalt? Many of the visitors who come today, can still feel the strong energy, as though their bodies are batteries being charged from the ground. Geologists and physicists, who are breaking out of the restrictions of conventional thought have started to experiment with such techniques. They may be rediscovering the past.

The ten temple shrines are set in one line, all on the upper floor, which one reaches through a narrow set of stairs. One starts from the shrine above the entrance gate, which once held the big drum, and goes on to the shrine where the mount of Lord Shiva, the Nandi (Bull) sits all by himself. From there, one walks on to the small porch in front of the pillared mandapa, and then passes through this mandapa to the Sanctum Sanctorum – the small, square, dark and undecorated place, where the holy symbol of the Formless rests. For the Hindus, this is the Shivalinga, Buddhists can see it as a symbol of Sunyata, the realm beyond form. For others, it is whatever they feel. Above the Sanctum Sanctorum rises the Shikara into the sky, aligning the earth with the Universe. All these shrines are connected by bridges from one to the next, symbolising that all depends on all. The entrance gate lies to the West, so that one walks the shrines by facing east.

Then there are another five shrines, surrounding the Sanctum Sanctorum in a semicircle on a platform outside.

There are so many questions to which answers cannot be given by rational explanations. There are no inscriptions, no dates, no names, no-one knows who the conceptor was, who the artists were, what the original temple looked like, or why this temple was named after the snow-covered mountain Kailash, 1500 miles to the north…

By Kartika


Kailash Temple

“I will continue to fast until I see a new Shiva temple with my own eyes”, said the wife of the famous king Krishnaraja-I to her husband. What does a king supposed to do upon hearing this seemingly impossible demand from his beloved wife? Especially, when the queen’s demand was driven by her love towards the king himself. It was just a few months ago when Krishnaraja had suffered from a serious illness and could not be cured even after trying all possible treatments. His wife, who loved him very much, prayed to the god Ghrishneshwar (Shiva) to cure her husband and she vowed to construct a temple in the name of Lord Shiva if her wish was granted. The word Ghrishneshwar means “god of compassion” and the Ghrishneshwar temple which was nearby was an esteemed temple because it is one of the 12 Jyotirlinga shrines. Queen’s strong belief, prayers and her dedication towards her husband resulted in Krishnaraja getting cured and now she wanted to complete her vow. But constructing a temple takes time and it is not something that can be accomplished in a day, or a week or even a month. With every single day passing, queen was getting weaker and Krishnaraja who equally loved his wife was feeling helpless. When circumstances are exceptionally demanding, human creativity is also at its best. Recognizing that the queen had to see the newly constructed temple very soon, an architect came up with an ambitious but possible plan. He was going to carve a temple from a nearby hill and he was going to start carving from the top. Queen could see the top of the hill from a window in her apartments. Work was started immediately and the top of the temple (known as Shikhar) was carved out in just a few days. From her window, queen could see the finished Shikhar of the temple and she broke her fast to the delight of king Krishnaraja. What followed is a true marvel in the history of mankind. The entire hill was carved out in the form of a temple and the resulting structure is the world famous Kailash temple, sometimes also known as Kailasnath temple. It took several more years to bring this marvelous temple to life. Once built, the temple came to be known as “svayambhu” or “self-created”, because no one would believe that it could be built by humans. Work on the temple continued for several more decades, well beyond the reign of Krishnaraja.

There are several example of rock cut architecture in the world. Abu Simbel in Egypt, Petra in Jordan and Ellora caves in India are some of the most beautiful structures built by carving out rocks. Sometimes the entire facade of a rock is cut or sometimes carving is done in and around a cave. But Kailash temple is the only structure in the world where an entire temple complex is carved out of a single rock. It is also the largest structure in the world cut out of a single piece of rock. By looking at it’s intricate design and sheer size, one can’t stop but marvel at the ingenuity and planning that went into its construction.

A wonderful example of an art created using the ancient rock cutting technique using chisels and hammers, Kailash temple is a creation worth preserving.


Kailasa Temple of Ellora Facts and Architecture

Actual Date of Kailasha Temple Construction Still Unknown

The fascinating fact is, almost nothing is known about the origins, constructors and builders of Kailash temple, there are no dates neither, any trace or inscriptions to describe the construction to be known to the world on the overall process and entire purpose of construction. This indicates that the carving dates back to hundreds of years – other experts put it thousands of years old and later some developments and changes were made by Buddhist and Jainese monks – thereby involvement of several generations of Hindu kings and later also followers of new religions when some of the Hindu kings got inclined towards some aspects of Buddhism and Jainism. The inscriptions are very old, most of them got diminished as hundreds of years passed by. Deciphering and reading inscriptions is almost impossible. A pious Hindu Sage can reassess the entire process of construction, if he has yogic powers to telepathically interact in the past-timescale with the Sages of that time. Recently, Rashtrakuta king (756-773) undertook some of the renovation in terms of cleaning and upkeep of the divine structure.

Where Each Pillar Speaks to You in Divine Language


Philosophy & History of Kailash Parvat & Mansarovar Lake

All the great thing has an even greater history behind it, whether it’s a historical Human being or a historical monument or a natural existence. So do these significants thing has something to recollect from the past and so does the great Kailash Mansoravar. Sitting at the center of great Himalayas catching all the attention, this prestigious mountain has a chain of histories related to it in 4 different religions. All the four religions which are Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism and Bon religion have momentous stories related to the pristine Mount Kailash.

With the Hindu mythology, Mount Kailash has treasure of significance, importance and acknowledgement, whether it is the Purans or the Vedas. Kailash Mansarovar is considered to be the home of Lord Shiva and goddess Parvati along with Devtas, Ganas, Yakshas, Yogis, Siddha Purushas and Gandharvas. It is said that Shiva the lord of destruction and regeneration sits at the peak of the mountain and meditates there. As per the Skanda Purana, Supreme Hindu text, Kailash Mansarovar is Supreme Mountain where Lord Shiva resides and thus the name Kailash Mansarovar came into being. Kailash means the mountain where God Shiva lives and Mansarovar is the holy lake where lord Shiva and Indra swam as Swans.

Narration based upon the Hindu Mythology, the lake Mansarovar was first created by Lord Brahma in his mind, after which it was materialized on Earth. Thus in Sanskrit it is known as ‘Manasarovar’ which is the combination of words ‘Manasa Sarovaram’ which means ‘mind’ and ‘lake’. The lake is also known for its summer abode for Hamsa or swan. These birds are considered as sacred in the Hindu Dharma and an important element in the semiology of the Region, representing wisdom and beauty. Another story from Hindu mythology describes the origination of the lake Mansarovar in a completely different manner. According to the ancient scriptures, the hand of Sati fell at the foot of the great mountain creating the pristine Mansarovar Lake. And thus it is considered as the one of the 51 Shakitpeeths of Sati. During summer when the snow melts, it generates a sound of a kind. People believe that it is the sound of the drum carried by lord Shiva. Also it is said that the Neelkamal or the blue waterlily blooms and looks only in the direction of Mount Kailash during this time.

The lake Mansarovar is exhibited as the purest of pure, if one drink its water it is said that he gets cleansed of his sins committed over a hundred lifetimes and he go to the abode of Lord Shiva itself. It is also said that during the early hours “Amrit Vela” 3 to 5 in the morning Lord Brahma and the devas descends on the lake to bathe and thus the hour is considered as spiritual and known as Brahma Muhurta, Brahma’s auspicious time.


Mystery of Kailash Temple – A Shiv Temple built by Ancient Aliens ?

The Kailash or Kailasanatha temple is one of the largest rock-cut ancient Hindu temples located in Ellora, Maharashtra, India. A megalith carved out of one single rock, it is considered one of the most remarkable cave temples in India because of its size, architecture and sculptural treatment.

The Kailasa Temple is sometimes called the Kailashnath Temple, and was designed to resemble the sacred Mount Kailash located in Tibet, which is said to be the abode of the Lord Shiva. The two structures in the courtyard, as per traditional Shiva temples, have an image of sacred bull, Nandi, facing the Shivalinga. The Nandi mandapa and main Shiva temple are 7 m tall and built over two floors. Both are solid structures with elaborate illustrative carvings. The base level gives an effect as if elephants are holding the entire structure. Originally, this structure was coated in a thick layer of white plaster so that it appeared to be covered with snow like the sacred mountain some traces of this plaster remain today. One of the noteworthy structures in the temple is of demon king Ravana attempting to lift Mount Kailasa.


The Mysteries of The Ancient Kailasa Temple Still Ignites Curiosity

It’s believed that when discovered it was completely covered by white plaster and looked like kailash mountain, that’s why it was given the name “Kailas Temple” and dedicated to lord siva.

For centuries the mysterious Kailasa temple located in Ellora Caves of Maharashtra in India has intrigued researchers. It is the largest monolithic building in the world without any doubt. We can safely say, it is one of the planet’s most stunning sights. Overshadowed by sites such as Egypt’s Giza pyramids, England’s Stonehenge, the Mexican Sun Pyramid and Turkey’s Gobekli Tepe this ancient site is frequently forgotten. Yet this is one of the greatest architectural achievements of mankind, undoubtedly. People dragged massive rocks at Stonehenge and stood them upright but at The Kailasa Temple, they removed hundreds of thousands of tons of rock and molded the resulting structure to perfection. Mainstream scholars say that the region’s ancient caves date back between the 5th and 10th centuries A.D. But many believe that they’re not only hundreds but thousands of years old. The truth is that no one knows how or when this particular temple was constructed because it clearly shows a far more sophisticated technology than what we are told the Indian people had between the 5th and 10th centuries. The temple complex is cut from solid basalt rock leaving this impressive structure that boggles the mind completely. It is said to symbolize Mount Kailash, Lord Shiva’s Himalayan abode, one of the most powerful Hindu deities, and it is only one of the 34 cave systems that have been excavated.

This particular temple is believed to have been constructed during the rule of Krishna the first a ruler of the Rashtrakuta Empire in the 8th century AD. Astonishingly, it took just 18 years to complete the temple. It is estimated that a total of 300,000 to 500,000 tons of rock was quarried out of the vertical cliff and another mystery is where did the basalt go? It seems to have vanished without a trace along with the tools used to build the temple. If you consider the following hypothesis based on the commonly accepted facts, if people worked twelve hours a day every day for 20 years to build the temple, they would have had to dig no less than 20,000 tons of hard basaltic rock in a year, equivalent to 1666 tons a month or 55 tons a day or four to five tons every single hour, and then, of course, the residual rocks had to be disposed and the remaining exposed rock had to be intricately carved. Many who have researched it believe that the structure has been excavated vertically so that the final result could be achieved, the way we see it today.


Kailasa Temple Engineering Marvel Of India’s Master Builders

When visiting the Kailash temple in the silence before dawn, one can’t help but bow down to the ones who designed and carved this majestic reminder of an unknown past. As it is still dark, it is not the time to wander around and see what is there for the physical eye, such as the enclosing high walls of rock, the beauty and perfection of the structures of the shrines, the many statues of Vedic deities and celestials, the panels of the Ramayana and Mahabharata, the rows of elephants, lions and makaras, the powerful lion-like sharduls or the water pots topping the temple roofs. All this is for later in the day. Now, before noisy tourists, screaming school classes and groups of pilgrims come, is a time to go upstairs to the holy shrine, leave the senses behind to feel the REAL and communicate in solitude with what is beyond the mind.

The intricate and detailed panels carved into the temple wall. Credit: Kartika

Entering the Mandapa, in front of the Hiranyagharba, the Sanctum Sanctorum, is like entering another world. The sixteen massive pillars, set in perfect symmetry in groups of four, stand in majestic command, glowing from an Inner light. Whispering voices tell to circumambulate these pillars from left to right as though circumambulating the Universe and read the symbols, carved into each of the four pillar sides. Nothing is meant just as decoration, all bears a message to tell. But – how to read it? Only the heart can do so. For an analysing mind, the symbols remain just that. What if the heart is not open or not open enough? There are keys, some are easy to find, others are only for the Highest of women or men, waiting to be opened at a time when mankind is ready to understand, accept and realise a new era of Life.

One of the keys is easy to get. The Kailash temple is not built. All is cut and carved from ONE single piece of rock, hewn out of the Charanandri hills of the Sahyadri range of the Deccan Plateau at a village, which once was called Elapura, now it is known as Ellora, 30 km northwest of Aurangabad.

Nothing of the original temple was brought in from outside. All was created out of One, all is part of One. Nothing stands by itself. All is a symbol of the functions of creation. The Kailash temple is not just one of the many ancient sites the ancestors have left in what is India today. Officially it is a Hindu (Brahmanic) temple but it is more than that. It may well be one of the holiest sites on earth, a keeper of wisdom from long ago, a preserver of the lost knowledge of life. It is there for all who come and want to learn.

The Kailash temple. Credit: Kartika

Though this temple, its structure, design and carvings have been altered many times, the original message survived, guarded and protected by scores of angels, which are seen hanging in reliefs on the temple walls, surrounding the sculptures of deities or feel them as etherical beings when they come in the silence of the night to keep the cosmic functions alive by singing their songs of creation. Angels are all over Maharashtra’s ancient sites, but nowhere else are so many in just one place. Is this why the Kailash temple is open to the sky?

There are many more temples at this Ellora site, all next to each other thirty four are open to visitors. Some are Hindu, some are dedicated to Lord Buddha and some to Mahavira, the founder of the Jains. But unlike the Kailash temple, they are caves, hewn out horizontally, open only to the front (except for another smaller temple of the Jains). The Kailash temple was cut from the top down in a U-shape form, about 50 Meters deep in the back and sliding to lower levels on the sides to the front where there is the entry gate. Cut with what? With hammer and chisel? There are chisel marks along the walls of the rocks, but spiritual masters say, the chiseling was done long after the rock walls were cut and the original temple created. Were the chisels just use to straighten and smoothen the sides and carve out new galleries and caves in the enclosing walls? The mystery remains. How was it possible to cut down straight into this Basalt rock, dig a broad trench and leave a huge piece in the center out of which the temple shrines were carved, ten altogether?

That these rocks are full of crystals may be part of the answer. Could it be there once were technologies, using crystals not only to hold information as they now do in computers and mobile phones, but turning their vibrations into energy to cut rocks as hard as Basalt? Many of the visitors who come today, can still feel the strong energy, as though their bodies are batteries being charged from the ground. Geologists and physicists, who are breaking out of the restrictions of conventional thought have started to experiment with such techniques. They may be rediscovering the past.

The ten temple shrines are set in one line, all on the upper floor, which one reaches through a narrow set of stairs. One starts from the shrine above the entrance gate, which once held the big drum, and goes on to the shrine where the mount of Lord Shiva, the Nandi (Bull) sits all by himself. From there, one walks on to the small porch in front of the pillared mandapa, and then passes through this mandapa to the Sanctum Sanctorum – the small, square, dark and undecorated place, where the holy symbol of the Formless rests. For the Hindus, this is the Shivalinga, Buddhists can see it as a symbol of Sunyata, the realm beyond form. For others, it is whatever they feel. Above the Sanctum Sanctorum rises the Shikara into the sky, aligning the earth with the Universe. All these shrines are connected by bridges from one to the next, symbolising that all depends on all. The entrance gate lies to the West, so that one walks the shrines by facing east.

Then there are another five shrines, surrounding the Sanctum Sanctorum in a semicircle on a platform outside.

There are so many questions to which answers cannot be given by rational explanations. There are no inscriptions, no dates, no names, no-one knows who the conceptor was, who the artists were, what the original temple looked like, or why this temple was named after the snow-covered mountain Kailash, 1500 miles to the north…


The Ajanta and Ellora Caves

Ajanta Caves

Ajanta (more properly Ajujnthi), a village in the erstwhile dominions of the Nizam of Hyderabad in India and now in Buldhana district in the state of Maharashtra (N. lat. 20 deg. 32′ by E. long. 75 deg. 48′) is celebrated for its cave hermitages and halls.
Located 99-km from Aurangabad, Maharashtra, Ajanta encompasses 29 rock-cut rooms created between 200 BC and AD 650 using rudimentary hand tools. Most are viharas (living quarters), while four are chaityas (temples).


Ajanta Caves

Full resolution‎ (1,280 × 960 pixels, file size: 311 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)

The Ajanta caves were discovered in the 19th century by a group of British officers on a tiger hunt.

Ajanta began as a religious enclave for Buddhist monks and scholars more than 2,000 years ago. It is believed that, originally, itinerant monks sought shelter in natural grottos during monsoons and began decorating them with religious motifs to help pass the rainy season. They used earlier wooden structures as models for their work. As the grottos were developed and expanded, they became permanent monasteries, housing perhaps 200 residents.

The artisans responsible for Ajanta did not just hack holes in the cliff, though. They carefully excavated, carving stairs, benches, screens, columns, sculptures, and other furnishings and decorations as they went, so that these elements remained attached to the resulting floors, ceilings and walls.

They also painted patterns and pictures, employing pigments derived from natural, water soluble substances. Their achievements would seem incredible if executed under ideal circumstances, yet they worked only by the light of oil lamps and what little sunshine penetrated cave entrances.

The seventh century abandonment of these masterpieces is a mystery. Perhaps the Buddhists suffered religious persecution. Or perhaps the isolation of the caves made it difficult for the monks to collect sufficient alms for survival.

Some sources suggest that remnants of the Ajanta colony relocated to Ellora, a site closer to an important caravan route. There, another series of handcrafted caves chronologically begins where the Ajanta caves end.

Ellora Caves

Near Ellora , village in E central Maharashtra state, India, extending more than 1.6 km on a hill, are 34 rock and cave temples (5th–13th century).

Located about 30 Kilometres from Aurangabad, Ellora caves are known for the genius of their sculptors. It is generally believed that these caves were constructed by the sculptors who moved on from Ajanta. This cave complex is multicultural, as the caves here provide a mix of Buddhist, Hindu and Jain religions. The Buddhist caves came first, about 200 BC – 600 AD followed by the Hindu 500 – 900 AD and Jain 800 – 1000 AD.

Cave 30: Chota (small) Kailasa Temple, Ellora

Of the 34 caves chiselled into the sloping side of the low hill at Ellora, 12 (dating from AD 600 to 800) are Buddhist (one chaitya, the rest viharas), 17 are Hindu (AD 600 to 900), and 5 are Jain (AD 800 to 1100).

As the dates indicate, some caves were fashioned simultaneously – maybe as a form of religious competition. At the time, Buddhism was declining in India and Hinduism regaining ground, so representatives of both were eager to impress potential followers.

Although Ellora has more caves than Ajanta, the rooms generally are smaller and simpler (with exception of Kailasa Temple).

Visiting Ajanta and Ellora

One of India’s greatest architectural treasures, the Kailasa temple attracts thousands of tourists annually.
Today, both Ajanta and Ellora are maintained by the Maharashtra Tourism Development Corporation. The sites are open daily from 9 a.m. until 5:30 p.m., with guides available for hire. Visitors pay a small admission fee to enter the Ajanta site and extra to attendants for lighting cave details. Entry is free to all caves at Ellora except the Kailasa Temple.

A good base from which to visit Ajanta and Ellora is Aurangabad, serviced daily by Indian Airlines and East West Airlines flights from Mumbai (Bombay). The city has a variety of accommodations, ranging from a youth hostel to five-star hotels.

At least a three-night stay in Aurangabad is advised, because Ajanta
(100 kilometres northeast by road) requires a full-day excursion and Ellora
(30 kilometres northwest) a half-day.

A renowned Artist of India, has restored and preserved the Indian Heritage of Ajanta painting.

Renowned artist of Marathwada Mr. M.R. Pimpare has for the past 55, Years been trying to recreate the paintings of the Gupta – Vakataka period around 450 A. D. unfolding to the world the actual glory of Ajanta which over the years has suffered deterioration.

The centuries –old paintings of Ajanta caves recreated exactly as they were when freshly painted by the unknown artist recapture the past glory of the wall paintings on gigantic sheets of paper.

Mr.Pimpare has completed 350 paintings which measure from one foot to 65’ x 4’ in length capturing minute details of expression, facial flexion, contours of the body, movement of the muscles and other minute details.

Ajanta art gallery is a display of the restructuring of Ajanta cave paintings. It is a devoted work of 30 long years by Mr. M.R. Pimpare, an artist whose work is done on the basis of photographs and historical records like drawings with all details prepared indicating the extent of damaged portion and contracting it faithfully in colour.

Mr. Pimpare has undertaken an entirely new approach of preservation and conservation as well as restoration of paintings with the help of most scientific modern and sophisticated instruments. The new approach aims at conservation of paintings in its exact duplicate copy form exactly like the original which are displayed in the Art Gallery. It is also proposed by the Marathwada Statutory Development Board to have a permanent art gallery which would provide glimpses of the famous National Heritage.

Ajanta Art Gallery at present is located in Eknath Nagar, Near Shahnoor Miya Dargah.


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सत्य वचन: धर्म एव हतो हन्ति धर्मो रक्षति रक्षितः । तस्माद्धर्मो न हन्तव्यो मा नो धर्मो हतोऽवधीत् |
भावार्थ: धर्म का लोप कर देने से वह लोप करने वालों का नाश कर देता है और रक्षित किया हुआ धर्म, रक्षक की रक्षा करता है। इसलिए धर्म का हनन कभी नहीं करना चाहिए, जिससे नष्ट हुआ धर्म कभी हमको न समाप्त कर दे। ।
Meaning: Immortal Truth- Sanatan Hindu Dharma annihilates the abuser and destroyer and protects the one who protects Sanatan Hindu Dharma. Therefore, Sanatan Hindu Dharma should never be mocked and ridiculed, so that the destroyed and mocked Hindu Dharma never end up decimating us instead.


Tags archive: secrets of kailash temple

Since 2001, HariBhakt is ad free, donation free and analytics tracking free site. A small drop in the ocean of efforts to spread history, knowledge, bravery and facts about Hinduism and Bharat. Keep it lifetime free by sharing all our articles in social media sites. Be a Proud Sanatan Dharmi. Click to CONTACT US/SUGGEST US | Email us:

सत्य वचन: धर्म एव हतो हन्ति धर्मो रक्षति रक्षितः । तस्माद्धर्मो न हन्तव्यो मा नो धर्मो हतोऽवधीत् |
भावार्थ: धर्म का लोप कर देने से वह लोप करने वालों का नाश कर देता है और रक्षित किया हुआ धर्म, रक्षक की रक्षा करता है। इसलिए धर्म का हनन कभी नहीं करना चाहिए, जिससे नष्ट हुआ धर्म कभी हमको न समाप्त कर दे। ।
Meaning: Immortal Truth- Sanatan Hindu Dharma annihilates the abuser and destroyer and protects the one who protects Sanatan Hindu Dharma. Therefore, Sanatan Hindu Dharma should never be mocked and ridiculed, so that the destroyed and mocked Hindu Dharma never end up decimating us instead.


Watch the video: The Kailash temple at Ellora preserving ancient wisdom for mankind. Part - 1


Comments:

  1. Tobrecan

    There really is farcical, what then

  2. Dik

    Rather good idea

  3. Andreas

    Completely I share your opinion. It is good idea. It is ready to support you.

  4. Dugrel

    who says it is necessary to swing and watch the firebox then goes out

  5. Gormain

    no way

  6. Fearnleah

    A very good thing



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